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Poker Stove

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  • Poker Stove

    Hello everyone

    Having not used it too much, could I use Pokerstove to calculate such probabilities as, say, your two suited cards hitting a flush draw on the flop. I'm really interested in these types of flop stats but can't find reliable info. I thought that I would make a learning experience out of it and try to run it in Pokerstove, that is if anyone can help me figure it out!

    Thanks
    Tom

  • #2
    Hi Tom,

    Yes you can use PokerStove to work out these odds.

    You have to type in the following information:

    1) Your Hand
    2) Your opponents hand or range of hands
    3) the flop

    Then click Evaluate to see the odds.

    In my example we have A9s vs our opponents KTo
    flop is Ts 7s 4h

    This gives us a 45% chance to beat our opponents Top pair by hitting a flush or an Ace.

    See screen shot here:
    http://rapidshare.com/files/455128199/PStove.JPG

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for this Delliks, but I already knew PokerStove could do this. What i needed was the step before that - so for instance if you have A9s, how many times both an A and a 9 hit the flop. Or even how many times two hearts hit the flop.

      Like I say, I keep finding conflicting stats about this sort of thing and thought it would be nice to crunch my own numbers rather than basing my decisions on possibly inaccurate information.

      Thanks
      Tom

      Comment


      • #4
        Pokerstove won't do it.

        http://www.tworags.com/index.php?ACT...odo=view&ID=78
        Head Live Trainer
        Check out my Videos

        4 Time Bracelet Winner



        Comment


        • #5
          No...I didn't think it would but I wondered if there was a way that I didn't know of. Thanks anyway!

          Ah I have that link bookmarked :-) It just showed different figures to another site I was looking at, but now I cant find.

          Do you think that I can use these figures in the same way I would for flopping a set? (ie 8-1, and looking to earn more with implied odds) Or is there a different way to treat, for example, hitting two pair on the flop?
          Last edited by tomrankin51; Thu Mar 31, 2011, 10:04 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tomrankin51 View Post
            Do you think that I can use these figures in the same way I would for flopping a set? (ie 8-1, and looking to earn more with implied odds) Or is there a different way to treat, for example, hitting two pair on the flop?
            According to the chart, the odds of flopping 2 pair starting with unpaired hole cards and hitting both to the flop, is 48.5-1 against. And of course that has even less chance of holding up than a set, so with implied odds I'll say you need 80-1.

            Hopefully you can see that this silly (but truthful) response is no. Technically it's yeah, sure, if it has practical application. In the case of these longshots it usually will not.
            Head Live Trainer
            Check out my Videos

            4 Time Bracelet Winner



            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks Dave, I did know that you'll be relieved to know!

              Though, this brings up another question to address....

              Take for example playing K9o on the button. Substitute any similar hand (ie. KT, AJ - big, high gappers). Whether you play this hand or not is irrelevant - some do, and in some instances you may have to if running a little dry.

              What are you actually looking to achieve with these sorts of hands? Lets take K9o. As we've already said, you wouldn't look to flop two pair because it's such a longshot. You wouldn't look to flop trips because you would never get paid off, same with a straight. No flush either given that it's offsuit (if it's suited I see the value in looking to flop a flush draw).

              So this means you look to play for only a pair. A pair of Kings? Well...no. What if you flop the King? Your opponent(s) may have KT, KJ, KQ, AK (and I'm disregarding any sets, but yes they could be out there too). So you would look to flop a 9 giving you a weak pair second kicker.

              But wait! What if the flop has higher cards than a 9.....?

              So, answering my own question in the hope it provokes more response, with hands like K9o you look to flop top pair with your lower card, with second kicker...which sounds very unlikely too....

              Comment

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