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Jergul's Updated Book List

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  • Jergul's Updated Book List

    Have had their first reading unless noted. I will eventually read to shreds as is my wont. Feel free to ask me what I thought about any of those, or comment random selection process (2+2)

    Febuary-March 2012
    Greenstein - Ace on the River
    Hansen - Every Hand Revealed
    Harrington - Harrington on Holdem 1-3
    Hilger & Taylor - The Poker Mindset
    Nelson, Streib, & Heston - Kill Everyone. Advanced Strategies for No-Limit Holdem
    Sklansky - The Theory of Poker
    Sklansky & Malmuth - Holdem Poker for Advanced Players
    Last edited by jergul; Wed Mar 28, 2012, 01:02 PM. Reason: Added Gus, done with gus

  • #2
    Would be interested to hear what you think about Kill Everyone once your finished with it.

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    • #3
      EDIT
      100% done. I think the book is incredibly valuable. I cannot appreciate everything I read, but I can appreciate that other people understand it. So I know more about what influences their play.

      Besides, the book was rather cheap at 8 bucks. A much better investment for me than losing 8 dollars in tournament buy-ins.

      ==================

      Am 43% done. Kindle is great (you can change font sizes, so page numbers are meaningless - so it tells you % read instead).

      More than enough.

      The book is great. For me its current relevance is it gives me some inkling of what is going down when people are playing good poker. I suppose I will eventually reach a point of playing adequate poker - and that will be because I start thinking somewhat the way I should when at the table.

      Great players explaining what is going down and why. I would buy the book again.

      Its not the kind of book you are done with in one read.

      *mumble*

      Here is a possible huge irony to be drawn from the book: If a good player knows I am a poor player, then I can manipulate the crap out of him.
      Last edited by jergul; Fri Mar 23, 2012, 07:45 PM. Reason: Done!

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      • #4
        Interestingly, Hansen ignores ICM calculations completely in pre-bubble play. By my reasoning this is for two reasons - 1. He is playing to win, so pre-bubble ICM is irrelevant. 2. He ignores bluffs when ranging opponent and calculating pot odds.

        The 2nd bit is probably more important from a cash EV perspective. While he is overvaluing his cash odds by ignoring ICM, he is undervaluing by ranging without bluff holdings.

        Note that he really cares about the ladder (ICM) when at the final table and particularly when 3 people are left. I think by extension he starts to care in the mini pre final table bubble. He just had the chips to ignore it in that 2007 event (though he focused a lot on not getting into trouble with stacks that could seriously weaken his final table chances).

        Just my few cents. It seems to work out for him at any rate

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jergul View Post
          Note that he really cares about the ladder (ICM) when at the final table and particularly when 3 people are left.
          This is the normal way of thinking about ICM in MTT's. ICM really affects the way you should play when there are very immediate and large pay jumps. For example, if 4th pays $4 and 3rd pays $100 and 2nd pays $250 and 1st pays $600, then ICM is going to be super relevant when play is 4-handed. On the other hand, if 1000th pays nothing and 999th pays $0.10, but 1st place pays $10,000, then the bubble does not represent a very large pay jump, so ICM doesn't mean a ton. That's why pay jumps are so relevant when 3-handed; that's where most of the money is.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by PanickyPoker View Post
            This is the normal way of thinking about ICM in MTT's. ICM really affects the way you should play when there are very immediate and large pay jumps. For example, if 4th pays $4 and 3rd pays $100 and 2nd pays $250 and 1st pays $600, then ICM is going to be super relevant when play is 4-handed. On the other hand, if 1000th pays nothing and 999th pays $0.10, but 1st place pays $10,000, then the bubble does not represent a very large pay jump, so ICM doesn't mean a ton. That's why pay jumps are so relevant when 3-handed; that's where most of the money is.
            Yah, I was mostly interested in how ignoring bluffs (garbage hands) when ranging tweaks pot odds towards correct when ICM is also ignored. I certainly understand why his interest is kindled as the final table approaches.

            The real correct question to ask: "Is the +EV value of not folding minus the +EV [cash] value of folding my hand greater than 0?". The answer depends on a lot of factors, so can never be an exact science.

            Ignoring ICM in general is sort of like overestimating outs slightly and thus getting pot odds slightly wrong. In the long run it costs. Hansen's balancing trick is oddly elegant in the way it addresses this smallish leak.

            I think I will use it

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