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Learning other games

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  • Learning other games

    Hi guys, Quick question for those of you that have learnt other games to NLHE. If I'm concentrating on improving at NLHE, would learning other games such as Omaha help with my game? I'm signed up for the Limit HE live training as I can see how that would help. Appreciate views and experiences. umbup: Cheers, Apex

  • #2
    Hiya
    In my opinion, trying to learn several variants of Poker at the time is perhaps not the best idea, far better to learn one at a time untill you feel confident enough to move on. I was playing both tourney, and cash NLHE, and to be honest because the stratagy for each is quite different seemed not to be able to progress in either, im now concentrating on cash games, within my bankroll and am finding it more productive. Hope that helps

    Good luck
    Moderator

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    • #3
      Interesting question. Many ideas do cross over, but the big thing is that nl holdem has both fewer and bigger decisions. I encourage you to try some alternatives, you might find yourself preferring one over nl holdem.

      Fixed limit holdem is a very different game. It has many plays that will seem strange to a nl holdem player. Semibluffing reraises when you are in position, on the flop, so you can buy a free river card is a nice play, especially against 2 or more. In nl, you are usually semibluffing to get folds with a backup plan of hitting the nuts sometimes if called. Although you do get the choice to take the free river card quite often. But the pot will be much bigger. Making crying calls on the river is much more common, since you often have to be behind better than 90% of the time to fold. If you see someone folding too much on the river, bluffing can be profitable in big if you think they will fold even 10% of the time. Calling with weak draws in big pots is alien to a nl player, but often mathematically good play in limit. Overall, fixed has a very different feel and requires making consistently good decisions. In nl making incorrect folds isn't as bad as making bad calls. While in limit, making incorrect folds in big pots, where you don't have to be right very often, will over time be costly.

      The alternate games I prefer are fixed limit Stud hl and pot limit Omaha hl(PLO8). Lately I've been playing STUD HL for a fantastic 30bb per hundred hands. At the tables I play, 3 out of 4 make mistake after mistake. I've seen players show down quads made on fourth or fifth street, playing against a player going for a high hand and 2 going for the lo, without ever betting! Seriously, several times. That's a great time to make value bets on every single street, at worst you split with a lo, many times you scoop the whole pot. I've also seen the only lo hand fail to bet bet bet against 2 high hands. Not to mention the players with junk hole cards, going deep into the hand. Or a high hand calling down bets against an obvious low for street after street, hoping the lo doesn't make a straight or flush so he can get half chips back. EASY MONEY. In PLO8 hand selection and position are paramount. Most players at the lower limits ignore both. If you want to play PLO hi, be aware that betting huge draws is the order of the day, getting it allin with combo draws against made hands is very common, which will lead to you winning and losing a lot of big pots. I find I don't like that kind of variance.

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      • #4
        I agree with wiltshireman about trying to learn both tournament and cash game nl holdem strategies at the same time. There is crossover with deep stacks at the beginning of tournaments and cash games*, but the strategies shift as stacks get shallower. When was the last time you properly shoved T8 utg in a cash game? I've done that with 8bb in 9 player sngs and tournaments many times.
        But when it comes to learning a different game, you won't slow your nl holdem growth. Well, ok, holdem players absolutely love AA in plo and plo8, going way too far with them. The human brain has trouble really learning anything related to the last new concept after about 15 minutes of study. But if we switch to something different, we can learn that for the next fifteen minutes.


        *Take a look at Roland's play here:
        http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/blo...ber-roland-gtx

        fine play with shallow tournament stacks, terrible with 200bb, typical mistake of an aggressive tournament player, who is used to shallow stacks and not deep stack cash games.

        sorry roland

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey Apex if you want we can play PLO play money HU sometime, i would like to learn PLO.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi all,

            Thanks for all your views... I'm currently doing NLHE cash alongside NLHE tourney but am aware that different strategies are required luckily! If I hit the wall, I'll concentrate on NLHE cash to build up my bankroll.

            CrazYJohnnie, I need to learn Omaha basics first, but am happy to play PLO play money. The only issue with play money is the suicide maniacs, but seeing as we are both trying to learn, I'm sure it won't be like that!

            Same offer to anyone else, I'm happy to play "play money" HU on NHLE cash or SnG to try to improve both of our games.

            Cheers,

            Apex

            Comment


            • #7
              well you can always play for play money at Home Game club, join if u have not yet and simply PM when you wann play PLO play money, i like the game yet i dont feel confident enough to play it for real money yet.

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