PokerStars homepage
  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Calculating "Outs"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Calculating "Outs"

    I'm a new player and have been reading the poker school tutroial. In it,it gives an example that if you hold A(H)3(H) and then the flop comes with 7(H)9(C)K(H) then you have 9 outs which would then give you a flush. But when calculating outs dont you also include any other cards that would improve your hand ie there are 3 more As and 3 more 3s out there to give you a pair, so arent there 15 outs with this hand? Thx for an explanations on this.....

  • #2
    Originally posted by Swami Andy View Post
    I'm a new player and have been reading the poker school tutroial. In it,it gives an example that if you hold A(H)3(H) and then the flop comes with 7(H)9(C)K(H) then you have 9 outs which would then give you a flush. But when calculating outs dont you also include any other cards that would improve your hand ie there are 3 more As and 3 more 3s out there to give you a pair, so arent there 15 outs with this hand? Thx for an explanations on this.....
    Hi Andy, You've already kinda answered your own question with this one. This example from the Calculating Outs article where you are holding is specifically taking about a flush draw only in this case, other examples are listed for straight draws and draws with over cards etc, but this example is talking about outs to make the flush draw only. Raiser umbup:
    Moderator

    Bracelet Winner


    Comment


    • #3
      The reason you'll generally only count the flush cards as outs is that if you hit the flush and you have the ace, and the board doesn't pair, you will have the stone cold nuts.
      It's not a good idea to count the other aces and threes as outs, because one pair is unlikely to be the best hand at showdown, but the nut flush will be.
      Bracelet Winner

      Comment


      • #4
        Thx. that makes sense as i guess someone might have a with a higher kicker or be able to beat a pair of 3s easily.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm having trouble with this also. When using the rule of 2 and 4 to calculate outs, do you work it out for each individual hand? I took the test at the bottom of the page and only got 25% . One of the questions was something like you have Ac Kc and your opponent has 2d 2h and the flop is 10d 10s 3s . What is your chance of winning? and how ever I worked it out I couldn't get any of the 3 choices. There's 4 queens, 4 jacks for the straight, 2 10s for four of a kind with an ace kicker,3 aces or 3 kings or 3 threes for 2 pair. That makes 76% which is clearly wrong. Can someone help?

          Comment


          • #6
            If the board is TT3 and you have AK, a queen or a jack will not give immediately you a straight. You'd need runner-runner to make a straight or quads or a full house. It's pointless couting runner-runners as outs, because you're very unlikely to hit them. The immediate outs you have are 3 aces, 3 kings and 3 treys. 9 outs x 4 (because you are seeing two cards) = about 36% chance of having the best hand. If you were just seeing one card, then it's just 9 outs * 2 = 18%.
            Bracelet Winner

            Comment


            • #7
              Ah so I should only count outs that immediately give me the best hand. I understand now thanks for the help.

              Comment

              Working...
              X

              X Cookies Information

              We have placed cookies on your computer to improve your experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.