PokerStars homepage
  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rule of 2 and 4 Question

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rule of 2 and 4 Question

    If one player holds AK, the other holds QQ on a flop of K34 (no flush draws)

    If I understand the rule correctly QQ has 2 outs I need to multiply by 4. So AK is a big favorite to win the hand and QQ has only about 8%.

    Is this correct?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Yes that is correct umbup:

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Beginner358 View Post
      If one player holds AK, the other holds QQ on a flop of K34 (no flush draws) If I understand the rule correctly QQ has 2 outs I need to multiply by 4. So AK is a big favorite to win the hand and QQ has only about 8%. Is this correct? Thanks
      Hi, Absolutely correct umbup: For those who haven't heard about the 'Rule of Two & Four' yet here's a quick explanation Once the flop has come out count your outs. In the example above it's 2 Queens. Multiply that number by 4 to get your percentage chance of making the hand on the turn. Then if we don't hit it on the Turn multiply it by 2 to get your percentage chance of making the hand on the River. As always there's many other things to observe and watch but using this rule is very useful as you play your drawing hands. Raiser umbup:

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Beginner358 View Post
        If one player holds AK, the other holds QQ on a flop of K34 (no flush draws)

        If I understand the rule correctly QQ has 2 outs I need to multiply by 4. So AK is a big favorite to win the hand and QQ has only about 8%.

        Is this correct?

        Thanks

        There is just one problem with you scenario. You know what the opponent's hand is. Makes it easy to figure out if your hand is a winner or not. In any game, you have no firm indication what your opponent has. When you're in a hand like this, you have 11 cards that can improve your hand. (3-aces, 2-kings, 3-threes, and 3-fours)

        Sounds good until the opponent calls your bet, or raises you. In that situation, you may have lost two of your out, or the player has a straight draw. (ace-deuce, deuce-5, or 5-6)

        Now he has eight draws to improve while you have eleven. A lot tighter hand than initially thought.

        What I'm getting to, is that knowing how many outs can improve your hand gives you an indication of your hand's strength. It is just one factor in your decision to either call or reraise your opponent.

        Comment

        Working...
        X

        X Cookies Information

        We have placed cookies on your computer to improve your experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.