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  • I know my problem,but still...

    what is the best way to overcome tilt..or playing like maniac..

    i grind many times from $10-$100 or once up to $500..

    but it come down to none,cos i always tilt or playing above my level (mostly),i cant take a hit,even just for 1 day..

    any suggestion?

  • #2
    Originally posted by GODvsDOG View Post
    what is the best way to overcome tilt..or playing like maniac..

    i grind many times from $10-$100 or once up to $500..

    but it come down to none,cos i always tilt or playing above my level (mostly),i cant take a hit,even just for 1 day..

    any suggestion?
    Click on library and type "tilt" in the search function theres some really good articles there such as http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...-Avoiding-Tilt, or if youre feeling extra lazy type "how to deal with tilt +poker" in google.

    I also recomend to ask yourself why youre playing poker in the first place, do you want to win?

    Comment


    • #3
      take a break... go have a beer... anything to get away from playing for a period of time.
      Super-Moderator



      6 Time Bracelet Winner


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      • #4
        Maybe because you are playing in limits too high for your bankroll. I don't go on tilt, I just yell at the computer screen like Phil Hellmuth style then go back to playing my normal game. Some people tilt to get rid of rage, but yelling like Hellmuth works wonders for releasing tension i.e. 'You ##@$#@ donk how could you shove with a 4% chance to win and hit a lucky river, dumb #$#@$' etc. It helps me, maybe it won't help you though haha.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 2edgar View Post
          Click on library and type "tilt" in the search function theres some really good articles there such as http://www.pokerschoolonline.com/art...-Avoiding-Tilt, or if youre feeling extra lazy type "how to deal with tilt +poker" in google.

          I also recomend to ask yourself why youre playing poker in the first place, do you want to win?
          thanks for the link..ofc i wanna win,thats why i always end up none,cos i chase my lost by playing higher level..
          maybe i havent got the patience to play,,how the hell i am gonna make this as a living..? *lol just a thought

          ps: i am relatively new to poker scene,my friend from UK introduce me to online poker 4 yrs ago,but i dont really play a lot lately..

          Comment


          • #6
            A frequent problem for new and/or occasional players is results oriented thinking. Poker is fundamentally about making good decisions, not about winning the most pots.

            Good decisions lead to profit, but at times variance gets in the way. Holding your own, or dropping down if your bankroll suffers too much, is the way to overcome variance.

            Comment


            • #7
              [

              Don't been there burned that T-shirt.

              Loss is a normal part of poker. Just play at your level and the variance will balance out.

              Search Bankroll management, not tilt for some good ideas as how to continue to be a winning player.

              This video was a big eye opener for me in the amounts needed befor you move up a level.


              Grade b
              Last edited by Grade b; Mon Nov 21, 2011, 05:56 PM. Reason: To make post more readable
              I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. ~Winston Churchill

              13 Time Bracelet Winner


              Comment


              • #8
                Frustration causes losses and that leads to tilting. You're trying to recoup what you lost in an earlier hand and every hand you folds only increases that tendency. The question then is how to prevent tilt, or at least control it.





                1 ---- Bankroll management
                That has to be the best suggestion made. Stepping into a higher risk game than you are ready to handle will lead to losses. With proper bankroll management, you'll be playing where you should, not where you want.

                2 ---- Skill level
                Unless you are god's gift to poker, it will take some training to become a good poker player. I'm not insulting you, just saying what each of us should know about ourselves. Think of a child. A child must crawl before they walk, and walk before they run. Same in poker. Start at the lowest level and work higher. Jumping to a higher level is the formula for failure.

                3 ---- Learn
                There are a lot of tutorial information here, use it. Access whatever information you can and use it. By the same token, don't overdose. Take a few lessons and then try applying those lessons. If you would like to play sit-n-go games, do the course and then hit the lowest priced games. As your skills increase, move up a price notch.

                4 ---- The forum
                Check out the topics. You'll find so much helpful information on specific game situations. Some will be specific to the PSO games, but there's much more if you search the forum. If you have a question regarding a particular situation, post it. You'll be surprised by the responses.

                5 ---- Play money
                Don't laugh. Yes, the play doesn't resemble the "real game," but it is a harmless way to experiment. Want to push super aggressive? Hate being uber-tight? Play money allows you the opportunity to try playing in a manner other than your usual style. Some players find acting like a donkey in a play money game releases the frustration after losing to a jerk.

                6 ---- Profit
                We all want to make a profit from poker. As a casino table game dealer, I learned a few things about making money. The biggest trick is knowing when to leave. The smart player goes for a 10% profit. So when you decide to play, set yourself a "review time." If you are playing tourneys, check whenever you bust from a game or it end. In rings, set a specific time, such as at the end of an hour. If you are ahead by more than the 10%, have fun with the excess, but leave when it disappear.

                7 ---- Game
                Poker has many styles. If no limit hold'em isn't pleasurable, try a different game. Just because you are a member of the school doesn't mean you cannot play draw poker for profit. Only a fool keeps throwing money at a game they find difficult.

                8 ---- Work versus fun
                Decide right now why you are playing poker. If it is for money only, anticipate lots of work as you learn such vital online skills as multi-table play. If you see the game as recreational, this does not mean you've given up on the profit motive. It just means your expectations should be set a lot lower.

                9 ---- Expectations
                Be realistic. Do you honestly think you can win that Sunday Million game at this time? What about a game costing half that? Keep looking at the menue of games and select the ones you believe you have a realistic chance of winning. Play the cheapest one a few times and see if you are right. If you are knocking 'em dead, move up a level. Lossing? Move down a level.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I disagree with point number six - profit. Assuming you have proper bankroll management then you should continue to play as long as you are playing well. If you're playing bad then stop. Each hand is a continuation from the last hand and if you make good decisions each hand puts you on the road to eventual gain. There is never a reason to stop playing if you have the bankroll for your limit and you're playing your A game. 'Having fun with the excess' is also bad since it implies you're going to gamble with your winnings. You should keep making fundamentally good decisions because any money that comes in is your money and is part of your bankroll.
                  Last edited by Ravzar; Mon Nov 21, 2011, 10:16 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ravzar View Post
                    I disagree with point number six - profit. Assuming you have proper bankroll management then you should continue to play as long as you are playing well. If you're playing bad then stop. Each hand is a continuation from the last hand and if you make good decisions each hand puts you on the road to eventual gain. There is never a reason to stop playing if you have the bankroll for your limit and you're playing your A game. 'Having fun with the excess' is also bad since it implies you're going to gamble with your winnings. You should keep making fundamentally good decisions because any money that comes in is your money and is part of your bankroll.

                    Originally posted by Cairn Destop View Post

                    6 ---- Profit
                    We all want to make a profit from poker. As a casino table game dealer, I learned a few things about making money. The biggest trick is knowing when to leave. The smart player goes for a 10% profit. So when you decide to play, set yourself a "review time." If you are playing tourneys, check whenever you bust from a game or it end. In rings, set a specific time, such as at the end of an hour. If you are ahead by more than the 10%, have fun with the excess, but leave when it disappear.


                    Okay, let's consider the topic, which is avoiding tilt. As Ravzar said, if you are playing your A-game, there is no reason to stop once you hit a certain point. However, varience will happen and having a firm cutoff point will prevent tilt if you are ahead. This does not mean one should change from solid poker to maniac because there is some "excess funds." The truth is that having the excess should encourage you to continue playing your A-game.

                    Having those excess funds allows you the chance to do some experimenting, which is what I mean by "having fun." Do you always fold low pockets? If you have that cushion, you might experiment by playing a low pocket hand. Hate suited connectors? With a cushion, play to see the flop. In other words, try expanding your selection range for a few hands. If it doesn't work, go back to the A-game until you are ahead.

                    Bankroll management does not stop a player from going on tilt. It establishes the proper limits for a game, which should reduce the risk of playing catch-up if your money goes down the tubes. Such feelings lead to tilt. Such management is static. It happens before the game begins, and when the play is finished. My suggested 10% mark is to define when a game should end if you're ahead. Bankroll management allows one to lose the entire game stake with the knowledge that there is enough money remaining that you can try again, though maybe at a lower stake.

                    When I was a dealer, I cannot tell you how many players came to my table, hit a good run where they doubled, and left broke. If these players took the professional advice, they would drag that 110% and play with the rest. When that money disappeared, as it can at any game, leaving would mean a profit. Chasing that elusive big hit will eventually have you losing in the long term. The smart player accepts the small gains, banks it, and moves up in stakes slowly, thereby keeping whatever gains they realized.

                    Let me give you an example. A player is playing $2/$4 limit, which means the maximum cost per round will be $48. If the starting stake is $200, your initial decision point is at $268. (Opening stake of $200, plus 10%, plus one maximum bet.) You decide to reconsider your play at the top of the hour. If you are over the $268 mark, make a firm commitment to leave if your table stake ever dips below $220.

                    However, you should also have a definite time to stop regardless of your success or failure at the table. From my experience as a dealer, the players who consistently had a growing bankroll were the ones who set a time limit and held to it. When you begin playing, decide when to stop. You could pick something like a favorite show, meal time, or a specific time. When that time comes, stop, regardless of your success. There is always tomorrow.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      tilt is without a doubt my biggest leak, but i'm really getting a grip on it now, how? watch alot of tutorial videos and try to adjust your playing style, watch other players bad beats knowing your not alone, if u think your playing bad dont sit at a table trying to win your money back come off watch something on tv, i know man its hard to get outa your head when u tilt, i used to be on tilt the day after as well lol. Iv'e been playing for 7 years now various sites, dude watch the videos even consider some live training(its free) on here!!!! I know that when it comes to poker i'm not the man to give u advise but when it comes to tilt i'm an expert at it hehe.Don't have a break and a beer, not a good idea 3 hours later your back on the tables rat arsed giving the rest of your bankroll away

                      i have not tilted for 2 weeks now this is a record for me hehe, spend all your spare time watching tutorials learn how the good players think, its not easy to make money online, try a tag style of play, then develop your game from there, if u get bored then come off, getting bored is the first sign of tilt.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No kidding, i m on TILT now! Donk half of my bankroll in last 3days. But, still fighting the good fight... hope u did the same. GL...umbup:

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