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Las Vegas

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  • Las Vegas

    I am heading to Vegas in two weeks. This will be the first time playing poker in Vegas. I have played limit hold'em at many different local casinos and have played NL tournaments as well. I feel completely comfortable in those areas.

    But, the idea of playing in a NL ring game has always scared me. Probably because of the possibility that your entire buy in can be gone in one hand. However, after two years of saving for an adequate bankroll for the trip and reading "The Poker Mindset" to help detaching myself from the value of the money, I think I am ready to sit down at a $1/2 NL game, probably at MGM.

    Are there any drastic differences between tournament play and cash play that I should be aware of? I know that standard raises are not 3xBB, but more like 5-8 times BB. I have been told to walk around and observe the tables before getting a seat and to watch an orbit or two around my table before getting into a hand.

    Any other suggestions from the veterans?

  • #2
    Originally posted by max2497
    Are there any drastic differences between tournament play and cash play that I should be aware of? I know that standard raises are not 3xBB, but more like 5-8 times BB. I have been told to walk around and observe the tables before getting a seat and to watch an orbit or two around my table before getting into a hand.
    1. The blinds never go up.
    2. Who told you a standard raise wasn't 3*bb. The table's standard opening raise may be set at some other amount. It's not necessarily fixed at any amount. Sometimes people open for a call ($2.00), some for ($5.00), some for ($10; $12; $15; $17 it all depends on whose raising and what position they have. In the games I've played, their is a variety of opening bets. Do whatever makes your action unpredictable. Don't pattern bet based on the strength of your hand.
    3. If a seat is not available & they put you on a wait list; observing the action is advisable. You can see how the table is playing. You can find out who is splashing around or tight. You might even fiind out what a normal opening bet is.
    4. Anytime you are dealt cards, put something on them to protect them. When you get your seat, don't be anxious to post an out of position blind. Sit there and observe the action; see 3 above. When you begin to play, don't be afraid to fold your blinds when you have weak hands. Play most if not all your hands in late position. Watch what the players are doing. Don't act to fast when it's your turn, but don't slow the pace of the game unless you have a big decision. Take a breath, think about the actions ahead of you; how big the pot is (pot odds); now you look at your cards and decide what action you will take: fold, bet, raise, call. Probably in that order. Be patient, don't argue with the players. If you don't understand something, ask the dealer. If you get to a showdown, protect your cards if you think you have the best hand. If you don't see a hand better than your own, don't let them push the pot to another player until they show you the winning hand.

    If the dealer is doing a good job of managing the game, tip/toke one of the small chips ($0.50 or $1.00) when you win a hand over $10 to $15. It's not necessary to tip/toke yourself into being a loser.

    Oh, something I should have said to begin. HAVE FUN. You are more likely to win if you are having fun, just don't get carried away and loose track of why you're playing poker.

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